Joscelyn Godwin

Joscelyn Godwin was born in Kelmscott, Oxfordshire, England on January 16, 1945. He was educated as a chorister at Christ Church Cathedral School, Oxford, then at Radley College (Music Scholar), and Magdalene College, Cambridge (Music Scholar; B.A., 1965, Mus. B., 1966, M.A. 1969). Coming to the USA in 1966, he did graduate work in Musicology at Cornell University (Ph. D., 1969; dissertation: "The Music of Henry Cowell") and taught at Cleveland State University for two years before joining the Colgate University Music Department in 1971. He has taught at Colgate ever since.

Books By Joscelyn Godwin

  1. Cosmic Music

    Cosmic Music

    Edited by Joscelyn Godwin

    While every music lover senses the power and truth that reside in music, very few actually approach music as a path to cosmic knowledge. But the idea that the universe is created out of sound is an ancient one. This book brings together three contemporary German thinkers who exemplify this tradition: Marius Schneider, Rudolf Haase, and Hans Erhard Lauer.
  2. Harmonies of Heaven and Earth

    Harmonies of Heaven and Earth

    By Joscelyn Godwin

    All those who have ever reflected on music's inner reality have felt its universal and mystical aspects. Joscelyn Godwin turns to the metaphysical accounts of the higher worlds that are the birthplace of Harmony, following the path of musical inspiration on its descent to Earth, and illuminating the archetypal currents that lie beneath Western musical history.
  3. The Harmony of the Spheres

    The Harmony of the Spheres

    By Joscelyn Godwin


    Harmony of the Spheres traces the history of the idea that the whole cosmos, with its circling planets and stars, is in some way a harmonious or musical entity. This rich anthology shows how the concept of cosmic harmony has inspired philosophers, astronomers, and mystics from antiquity to the present day.

  4. Secret Lore of Music

    Secret Lore of Music

    By Fabre d'Olivet

    Written by Fabre d'Olivet (1767-1825), this classic study of music was the first to revive Pythagoras' ideas of the sacred nature of music and its profound effect on the soul. Godwin also provides a fascinating biography of d'Olivet.
  5. Atlantis and the Cycles of Time

    Atlantis and the Cycles of Time

    By Joscelyn Godwin

    Professor Godwin shows how the legends of Atlantis go hand-in-hand with the concept of cyclical history, such as the Vedic system of Yugas and the Mayan calendar. He examines the kindred myths of Lemuria and Mu along with the writings of Gurdjieff, Guénon, Cayce, and many others.
  6. The John Michell Reader

    The John Michell Reader

    By John Michell

    John Michell (1933-2009) was beloved and reviled for his heretical views. In this collection of essays he takes on Darwinism, superstition, Jesus, the Grail legend, agribusiness, the madness of modernity, and much more. Michell always took the larger view, reminding us that the “paradise of the philosophers” is still within reach for those with the vision to see it.
  7. The Kingdom of Agarttha

    The Kingdom of Agarttha

    By Marquis Alexandre Saint-Yves d'Alveydre


    The legend of Hollow Earth was introduced to the West in 1886 in Mission de l'Inde, translated here into English for the first time. Known as Agarttha or Shambhala, this kingdom beneath the Himalayas is governed by advanced spiritual laws and is home to libraries containing humanity's collective wisdom.

  8. Athanasius Kircher's Theatre of the World

    Athanasius Kircher's Theatre of the World

    By Joscelyn Godwin

    Jesuit, linguist, archaeologist, and exceptional scholar, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680) was the last true Renaissance man. His exploration was both a scientific quest and a religious experience. The Hermetic cast of Kircher’s thought, which was foreign to the concerns of those propelling the Age of Reason, caused his work to be overlooked--an oversight rectified in this volume.
  9. Athanasius Kircher’s Theatre of the World
    Athanasius Kircher was the last true Renaissance man, a Christian Hermeticist whose work also examined alchemy, the Kabbalah, and the Egyptian mystery tradition. Includes hundreds of stunning engravings that were a distinguishing feature of his work.
  10. Ride the Tiger

    Ride the Tiger

    By Julius Evola


    Julius Evola’s final major work identifies the type of person capable of "riding the tiger," who can give absolute meaning to life in a world of dissolution while transforming destructive processes into inner liberation. Ride the Tiger presents an implacable criticism of the idols and illusions of our modern age, offering hope for those who wish to reembrace Tradition.